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Home / Spectrum / Arch Neurol — Abstract: Brain Involvement in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders, November 2011, Chan et al. 68 (11): 1432

Arch Neurol — Abstract: Brain Involvement in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders, November 2011, Chan et al. 68 (11): 1432

Brain Involvement in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders

Koon Ho Chan, MD, FRCP; C. T. Tse, MBBS, MRCP; C. P. Chung, MBBS, MRCP; Raymand L. C. Lee, FRCR; J. S. C. Kwan, MPhil; P. W. L. Ho, PhD; J. W. M. Ho, PhD

Arch Neurol.?2011;68(11):1432-1439. doi:10.1001/archneurol.2011.249

Background? Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) are severe inflammatory demyelinating disorders of the central nervous system. Brain involvement is increasingly recognized.

Objective? To study brain involvement in NMOSDs among Hong Kong Chinese patients.

Design? Retrospective study of patients with NMOSDs.

Setting? Tertiary medical center in Hong Kong.

Patients? Thirty-four Hong Kong Chinese patients with NMOSDs of 2 years or longer were recruited.

Interventions? Brain and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging was performed during NMOSD attacks and was repeated yearly for the first 3 years.

Main Outcome Measures? We evaluated clinical features of NMOSDs associated with brain involvement and brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging.

Results? Among 34 patients with NMOSDs of 2 years or longer, 20 (59%) had brain involvement. The mean age at onset among these 20 patients was 45.6 years (age range, 19-67 years); 18 were women. Eleven patients (32% of all the patients with NMOSDs) had clinical manifestation of brain involvement, 19 patients (56%) had brain abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging consistent with inflammatory demyelination, and 2 patients (6%) fulfilled criteria for multiple sclerosis. Clinical manifestation of brain involvement included the following: trigeminal neuralgia; vomiting, vertigo, ataxia, dysphagia, and tetraparesis from lesions around the third and fourth ventricles and aqueduct; homonymous hemianopia, aphasia, hemiparesis, and cognitive impairment from extensive hemispheric white matter lesions; and ataxia, diplopia, hiccups, facial sensory loss, internuclear ophthalmoplegia, hemisensory loss, and hemiparesis from other lesions in the midbrain, pons, cerebellar peduncles, and medulla. Eight patients (24%) developed brainstem encephalitis clinically, and brainstem encephalitis was the initial clinical manifestation in 6 patients (18%). Brain abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging were detected in brainstem in 15 patients (44%), hemispheric periventricular white matter in 7 patients (21%), deep white matter in 7 patients (21%), corpus callosum in 4 patients (12%), subcortical white matter in 3 patients (9%), thalamus in 2 patients (6%), hypothalamus in 1 patient (3%), basal ganglia in 1 patient (3%), internal capsule in 1 patient (3%), periaqueductal gray matter in 1 patient (3%), and around the third and fourth ventricles in 1 patient (3%); large confluent lesions were detected in 2 patients (6%).

Conclusion? Brain involvement manifesting clinically as brainstem encephalitis is common among Hong Kong Chinese patients with NMOSDs.

Author Affiliations: Department of Medicine (Drs Chan, Tse, Chung, Lee, P. W. L. Ho, and J. W. M. Ho, and Mr Kwan), Neuroimmunology and Neuroinflammation Research Laboratory (Dr Chan and Mr Kwan), and Research Center of Heart, Brain, Hormone, and Healthy Aging (Drs Chan and P. W. L. Ho), Queen Mary Hospital, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

Read More: Arch Neurol — Abstract: Brain Involvement in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders, November 2011, Chan et al. 68 (11): 1432

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